Film Series

Filtering by: Film Series

Cine Mexico Now
Sep
23
to Oct 28

Cine Mexico Now

Cine Mexico Now brings award-winning contemporary Mexican cinema to the heart of Detroit. Curated from the world’s top film festivals, Cine Mexico Now includes films that bring to life a rich portrait of the Mexican experience. The series takes place September 23 - October 28 exclusively at Cinema Detroit with the support of Mexican Consulate in Detroit.

Detroit: Sept. 23 - Oct. 28 at Cinema Detroit.

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Cinemateca 2018
Aug
28
to Sep 25

Cinemateca 2018

Cinemateca's sixth biennial celebration of Latino, Latin American, and Spanish is devoted to work by women directors. Over five Tuesdays, screenings will begin at 7 pm, followed by post-show charlas (“discussions”) led by OLLAS faculty and special guests. Prior to show time, attendees will have the opportunity to sample food with connections to the films’ respective countries of origin. The series launches Aug 28 with Zama, the latest film from international cinema star Lucrecia Martel. The series also includes two Forever Young family-friendly films.

Omaha: Aug. 28 - Sept. 25 at Film Streams.

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América
Jun
27
7:00 PM19:00

América

When we first meet Diego—the magnetic emotional center of this sunny, warmhearted family portrait—he’s unicycling around a town square, disco-strutting on stilts, and beach-bumming around Puerto Vallarta. But when his frail but sweet-natured 93-year-old grandmother, América, is suddenly left without a caretaker, Diego—along with his two equally acrobatic brothers—leaves behind his laid-back life to return to his home in Colima, Mexico. In images at once meticulously composed and bursting with vitality, filmmakers Chase Whiteside and Erick Stoll celebrate the selflessness of caregiving and the infinite love coursing between generations.

New York: June 27 at BAM.

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Jungle Freaks: The Cinema Novo Of Joaquim Pedro de Andrade
Jun
7
to Jun 28

Jungle Freaks: The Cinema Novo Of Joaquim Pedro de Andrade

Joaquim Pedro de Andrade is one of the most important figures of Brazil’s Cinema Novo period and his film Macunaima (Jungle Freaks) helped to set the tone for this style of film that, much like its musical analogue, Tropicalia, gave the psychedelic and countercultural movements that were then sweeping the world a uniquely Brazilian beat. This Thursday night series includes Macunaima (1969), Os Inconfidentes (1972), Guerra Conjugal (1974), and O Homem do Pau Brasil (1982).

Austin: Thursdays in June. Details here.

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Carte Blanche: Edgardo Cozarinsky on Argentine Cinema
Jun
6
to Jun 24

Carte Blanche: Edgardo Cozarinsky on Argentine Cinema

Celebrated Argentine author and filmmaker Edgardo Cozarinsky made his North American cinematic debut with Dot Dot Dot (1971) in the very first New Directors/New Films festival, in 1972. Cozarinsky returns to MoMA with a Carte Blanche selection that juxtaposes classic and contemporary Argentine cinema in fresh and provocative ways. For example, a 1930s musical drama paired with a subversive theater improvisation from the late 1960s, or a 1950s noir about a child murderer paired with a recent coming-of-age drama about a different form of child abuse.  Cozarinsky will introduce many of the programs, together with the scholar and archivist Fernando Martín Peña.

New York: June 6 - 24 at MoMA.

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Double Pinilla
Apr
6
to Apr 27

Double Pinilla

In keeping with their presentations of clásicos tropicales góticos by Luis Ospina and Ivan Cardoso, Spectacle is exhibiting two Eighties rarities by living legend Jairo Pinilla, the so-called “Ed Wood of Colombia”. Also reigning from Cali (Ospina’s hometown, as well as the late Carlos Mayolo’s), Pinilla pioneered a form of acerbic camp cinema in constant struggle with Fono Cine, the government agency providing funding for some of his movies. While the films are well known among cineaste circles of Colombia, little is published in English about Jairo Pinilla. Series includes El triangulo de oro (1984) and Extraña Regresión (1985).

New York: April 6 - 27 at Spectacle Theater.

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Hola Mexico 10th Anniversary Screenings
Apr
5
to May 24

Hola Mexico 10th Anniversary Screenings

A Thursday series of films at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles. Comedies, dramas, and a biopic are in the series, which includes: Arrancame La Vida, Bala Morbida, Acorazado, Dias de Gracia, Casese Quien Pueda, Gloria, La Delgada Linea Amarilla, and La Vida Inmoral de la Parja Ideal.

Los Angeles: April 5 - May 24. Full lineup and details here. Screenings are free and followed by Q&A.

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La Soledad
Apr
1
5:00 PM17:00

La Soledad

Capturing the life of real people amidst the Venezuelan crisis, La Soledad is the story of José, a young father who discovers that the dilapidated mansion he occupies will soon be demolished. Desperate to save his family from homelessness, José begins a search for a cursed treasure that has long been said to be buried in the house.

Jorge Thielen Armand’s feature debut carves fiction from reality: La Soledad was once his family’s home; this story is true, acted out by the people who lived it. La Soledad is a magnificent feat of real-life storytelling—and a profound fusion of creativity and compassion.

San Francisco: April 1 at Roxie Theater.

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A Vizinhança Do Tigre (The Hidden Tiger)
Mar
26
7:15 PM19:15

A Vizinhança Do Tigre (The Hidden Tiger)

THE HIDDEN TIGER charts the lives of a group of young residents of Nacional, a neighborhood in the suburbs of the city of Contagem. Juninho, Menor, Neguinho, Adilson, and Eldo live their lives in dialectical fragments of joy and adversity. Some work in construction, others in drug trafficking; a few attend heavy metal concerts, others play with guns; they read, dance carioca funk, and deal with their families as they struggle with the demands of their daily lives. Music is a key element in Uchoa’s rigorously gentle mise-en-scène – in concert with his patient gaze, it helps to illuminate the faces and bodies of Uchoa’s protagonists. The camera captures and crystallizes moments of small beauty in a landscape of social and economic conflict.

New York: March 26 at Anthology Film Archives.

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Forbidden Fruit: Cuban Independent Film in the 21st Century
Mar
23
to Mar 29

Forbidden Fruit: Cuban Independent Film in the 21st Century

They come in all shapes and sizes. They are fearless and fly under the radar. They address a reality that’s either glossed over or spoken of in hushed tones. Armed with little more than their immense talent - and an overriding sense of humor - Cuban independent filmmakers have been carving out a significant niche for themselves. CGAC is delighted to pay tribute to these largely unsung movie heroes with a 9-program, 25-film salute.Forbidden Fruit: Cuban Independent Film in the 21st Century was programmed in collaboration with Alejandro Ríos, and with the enthusiastic participation of all filmmakers involved - in and out of Cuba.

Miami: March 23 - 29 at Coral Gables Art Cinema.

 

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Elena
Mar
21
to Mar 25

Elena

Elena, a young Brazilian woman, travels to New York with the same dream as her mother, to become a movie actress. She leaves behind her childhood spent in hiding during the years of the military dictatorship. She also leaves Petra, her seven year old sister. Two decades later, Petra also becomes an actress and goes to New York in search of Elena. She only has a few clues about her: home movies, newspaper clippings, a diary and letters. At any moment Petra hopes to find Elena walking in the streets in a silk blouse. Gradually, the features of the two sisters are confused; we no longer know one from the other. When Petra finally finds Elena in an unexpected place, she has to learn to let her go.

Austin: March 21 & 25 as part of CineNoche.

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¡Sí Se Puede! Pioneers of Chicano Cinema
Mar
16
to Mar 22

¡Sí Se Puede! Pioneers of Chicano Cinema

The path-breaking Chicano filmmakers who emerged in the 1970s and 80s represented onscreen, for the first time, a community hitherto ignored—or misrepresented—by mainstream media. Defying the odds, these directors created a counter-cinema that spoke to the unique experiences of Chicano life. Their films are chronicles both of struggle—against racism, economic exploitation, police abuse—and of a vibrant culture's history and traditions.

Popular favorites such as La Bamba and Selena will be shown along lesser-known gems including Please Don't Bury Me Alive!The Devil Never Sleeps,  and shorts programs.

New York: March 16 - 22 at BAM.

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Cuban Cinema under Censorship
Mar
9
to Mar 11

Cuban Cinema under Censorship

This exhibition aims to review more than half a century of censorship in Cuban cinema, which can be traced to a kind of foundational moment: Orlando Jiménez Leal and Sabá Cabrera Infante’s PM (1961). This short film’s censorship by the Institute of Cuban Film was among the first delimitations of cultural policy under the nascent socialist regime led by Fidel Castro. In the ensuing decades censorship by the Instituto Cubano de Arte e Industria Cinematográficos (Cuban Institute of Cinematographic Art and Industry), or ICAIC, was usually “aired out” within the institution. But in the new century, with the emergence of cinema that was independent from institutions and the editorial criteria of the state, the list of censored or repressed works increased rapidly. Manuel Zayas’s Odd People Out (2004) complements the investigation begun by Improper Conduct from a documentary angle, while Carlos Lechuga’s Santa & Andrés (2016) does the same through fiction. The latter film was the subject of a public state veto, a rarity among recent productions. Also featured in this series, Eliécer Jiménez’s Persona (2014), Miguel Coyula’s Nadie (Nobody) (2016), Juan Carlos Cremata’s Crematorio (Crematorium) (2013), Ricardo Figueredo and Anthony Bubaire’s Despertar (Awakening) (2011), and Marcelo Martin’s El tren de la linea norte (The Train on the Northern Railway) (2015) represent just some of the films—mostly documentaries—that have been subject to state vetoes and suffered from political suppression in the last decade.

New York: March 9 - 11 at MoMA.

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Laura Huertas Millán: Ethnographic Fictions
Mar
8
6:00 PM18:00

Laura Huertas Millán: Ethnographic Fictions

Investigating the terrain between fiction and ethnography, French-Colombian filmmaker Laura Huertas Millán has created a multifaceted body of work where political history and personal narrative meet. Her 2016 film Sol Negro is a portrait of Antonia, a Colombian opera singer, her sister, and her niece. Empathy and anger are exchanged between the women as they each reckon with feelings of deep sorrow and entrapment—within themselves and within the family. Huertas Millán’s La Libertad (2017) centers on a Mesoamerican matriarchal family that has inherited and mastered the art of weaving on the backstrap loom to explore the ties that bind labor and creativity. Across both of these ethnographic fictions, Huertas Millán’s careful attention to detail reflects the exquisite experience of everyday life.

Chicago: March 8 at the Siskel Film Center.

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El Indio: The Films of Emilio Fernández
Mar
1
to Mar 13

El Indio: The Films of Emilio Fernández

The son of a Kickapoo Indian and a revolutionary general, Emilio Fernández—known to generations of Mexican filmgoers as “El Indio”—was the most celebrated filmmaker to emerge from the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. Influenced equally by Hollywood narrative and Soviet montage techniques, Fernández brought an image of an eternal, elemental Mexico to the international festival circuit of the 1940s and ’50s, winning awards in Cannes (María Candelaria), Venice (La perla), and Karolvy Vary (Río Escondido). With a creative team that regularly included cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa, writer Mauricio Magdaleno, and stars such as Dolores del Río, Pedro Armendáriz, María Félix, Arturo de Córdova, and Ninón Sevilla, Fernández created an authentic Latino voice that continues to enchant and amaze, now returned to its full force and timbre in magnificent new restorations from the Mexican archives.

New York: March 1 - 13 at MoMA.

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El Peluquero Romántico (The Romantic Barber)
Feb
26
7:15 PM19:15

El Peluquero Romántico (The Romantic Barber)

Neighborhood barber Victor’s life is rather uneventful. He sticks to a strict daily routine at both work and home, where he spends his nights alongside his mother listening to boleros or watching movies from the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema on TV. His routine is disrupted when his mother suddenly dies. His flirtation with a young waitress and his reunion with an old girlfriend can’t fill the void left behind by his mother. That changes, however, when a man claiming to be his father suddenly walks into the shop one day. The encounter will lead him to an unexpected and life-changing trip to Rio de Janeiro. The fifth feature by Mexican director Iván Ávila Dueñas, THE ROMANTIC BARBER is a quirky and charming film about an anachronistic character in a vanishing environment.

New York: Feb. 26 at Anthology Film Archives.

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Allende mi abuelo Allende (Beyond my Grandfather Allende)
Feb
21
to Feb 25

Allende mi abuelo Allende (Beyond my Grandfather Allende)

Almost 42 years have passed since a military coup in Chile deposed the democratically elected government of President Salvador Allende. The death of Allende and the years of military dictatorship that followed have left deep scars in both the country and in Allende’s immediate family. In BEYOND MY GRANDFATHER ALLENDE, his granddaughter Marcia Tambutti Allende goes in search of Salvador Allende the man. The filmmaker’s aged grandmother slowly starts to talk more about Allende, her marriage and her role as the president’s wife. Other members of the family, many of whom never knew Allende personally, also start to talk and as a result we get to know the kind of man her grandfather was. 

Austin: Feb. 21 & 25 at Violet Crown Cinema.

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Life Is a Dream: The Films of Raúl Ruiz (Part 2)
Feb
9
to Feb 18

Life Is a Dream: The Films of Raúl Ruiz (Part 2)

Arguably Chile’s most internationally renowned and prolific filmmaker, Raúl Ruiz completed over one hundred films in numerous national cinemas. His mind-bending works are obsessed with questions of theology, philosophy, psychoanalysis, literature, and visual expression; wildly experimental and slyly humorous; surrealist, magical realist, gothic, and neo-Baroque. This is the second part of an ongoing retrospective devoted to Ruiz, including a weeklong revival run of a new digital restoration of one of his most beloved films, Time Regained (1999).

New York: Feb. 9 - 18 at Film Society of Lincoln Center.

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Los Sures
Feb
8
to Feb 21

Los Sures

In the early 1980s, Diego Echeverria took a 16mm camera into the streets of South Williamsburg, then a primarily Puerto Rican neighborhood known as one of the city’s poorest, most crime-ridden areas. What the filmmaker captures is a thriving street culture in which music, breakdancing, and graffiti abound. This lost-and-found time capsule is an essential record of pre-gentrification Brooklyn and a testament to a community’s resilience.

New York: Feb. 21 at BAM
Seattle: Feb. 8 at SIFF Film Center.

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Antonio Gaudí
Feb
4
to Feb 19

Antonio Gaudí

Catalan architect Antonio Gaudí (1852-1926) designed some of the world’s most astonishing buildings, interiors, and parks; Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara constructed some of the most aesthetically audacious films ever made. Here their artistry melds in a unique, enthralling cinematic experience. Less a documentary than a visual poem, Teshigahara’s ANTONIO GAUDÍ takes viewers on a tour of Gaudí’s truly spectacular architecture, including his massive, still-unfinished masterpiece, the Sagrada Familia cathedral in Barcelona. With camera work as bold and sensual as the curves of his subject’s organic structures, Teshigahara immortalizes Gaudí on film.

New York: Feb. 4, 9 & 19 at Anthology Film Archives.

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La idea de un lago (The Idea of a Lake)
Jan
29
7:15 PM19:15

La idea de un lago (The Idea of a Lake)

Based on Guadalupe Gaona’s novel, Pozo de aire, Milagros Mumenthaler’s second feature delves deeper into the relationship of cinema with loss, memory, and youth. Inés, a photographer, is putting together a book of poems and images about her own past. In doing so, she finds her family dynamics shifting, as she and her mother and brother all come to terms with the absence of her father, who disappeared during the military dictatorship in Argentina.

New York: Jan. 29 at Anthology Film Archives.

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Las Plantas (Plants)
Dec
14
7:15 PM19:15

Las Plantas (Plants)

Roberto Doveris’s debut feature film revolves around Florencia, a 17-year-old girl responsible for the care of her comatose older brother during the summer. Trying to survive with limited means and no assistance, she becomes obsessed with a comic book called “Las Plantas,” which depicts an invasion of earth by sentient plants who take possession of human bodies every full moon. At the same time, Florencia is going through her own sexual awakening, meeting strangers through the internet, and her monotonous daily routine begins to merge with the fantasy world of the comics and her own burgeoning desires. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize for Best Film at the Berlinale and associate-produced by Alicia Scherson (The Future, Family Life), Plants is “a sexually souped-up teen psycho-thriller…an original coming-of-age tale laced with pop culture” (Variety).

New York: Dec. 15 at Anthology Film Archives.

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Holy Blood: Mexican Horror Cinema
Oct
27
to Nov 2

Holy Blood: Mexican Horror Cinema

Since the late 1950s, Mexico has produced its own rich and distinctive strain of horror cinema, combining supernatural tales of witches and vampires with regional folklore, head-spinning surrealism, and heaps of creepy Gothic atmosphere. Brimming with cinematic invention, these high water marks of the genre are among the wildest, freakiest, and most unique horror movies ever made.

New York: Oct. 27 - Nov. 2 at BAM.

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Cárcel de Arboles (Prison of Trees)
Oct
27
7:00 PM19:00

Cárcel de Arboles (Prison of Trees)

Chained and tortured, dozens of youths from America and prominent Guatemalan families were held captive in the depths of the Guatemalan jungle in the 1970s and 1980s. With the complicity of the military high command that governed Guatemala at the time, they were brainwashed to worship Dave Burden, a quack American therapist, who carries out his dark project involving addicted and mentally ill youth. The film’s title comes from the novel by Rodrigo Rey Rosa, in which he narrates events similar to the ones that took place in the jungle prison many years before they became public knowledge.

Bloomington, IN: Oct. 27 at IU Cinema.

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Fernando de Fuentes’ Revolution Trilogy
Oct
1
to Oct 15

Fernando de Fuentes’ Revolution Trilogy

Between 1933 and 1936 Fernando de Fuentes, an up-and-coming Mexican filmmaker, directed three films about the nation’s recently-ended revolution (1910-1920). Though narratively unconnected, the three stand-alone films are linked thematically, sharing a clear-eyed view of the bloody struggle for tierra y libertad (land reform and liberty), and constitute an informal trilogy. All three were praised at the time of their release, and are still regarded as among the most important and memorable Mexican films. Responding to popular demand, AFS is proud to present these three classics of Mexico’s Golden Age Cinema. Each screening will be hosted by University of Texas Professor Charles Ramírez Berg, author of the book “The Classical Mexican Cinema: The Poetics of the Exceptional Golden Age Films.”

Austin: Oct. 1 - 15 at Austin Film Society.

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